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CITO research seminar "Proximity-based Offshore Outsourcing: Models for Globalisation Theories" Feb 25, 2005 from 04:00 PM to 06:00 PM Q233, Quinn School, Belfield,
Dr Pamela Abbott (who has recently joined us in the MIS Department and CITO) will give a research seminar entitled "Proximity-based Offshore Outsourcing: Models for Globalisation Theories" on Friday 25 February. For further details, please see the abstract below. Date: Friday 25 February Time: 4pm Venue: Q233, Quinn School of Business, BELFIELD. ALL WELCOME (please circulate) With best wishes Séamas ----------------- ABSTRACT ----------------- In this talk I will first review the major research topics explored in my PhD thesis, the abstract of which is appended below. I will then discuss my current research plans and areas in which I believe my research can engage in future. The talk is intended to inform colleagues of my general research pursuits and to encourage discussion on commonalities of interests and possible collaboration. PROXIMITY-BASED MODELS OF OFFSHORE SOFTWARE OUTSOURCING: Exploring the Concept of Location in Nearshore and Onshore Software Outsourcing Ventures The literature on offshore software outsourcing (OSO) has focused mainly on countries with large software export markets, such as India, while neglecting other developing countries which apparently lack the resources thought necessary to succeed in software development. Globalisation is seen to offer an opportunity for the development of IT industries in these neglected contexts, however, mainly due to the prevalence of information and communication networks. With the ongoing debate on globalisation and its contested effects, though, it would seem important and timely to study OSO within such under-researched contexts. This thesis thus focuses on proximity-based models of offshore outsourcing, such as nearshore and onshore outsourcing, which represent arrangements that seek to exploit geographical closeness to the client. In promoting locational competitive advantage, they seek differentiation from traditional offshore models in temporal, spatial and cultural terms. As a means of examining these claims, this thesis will explore the themes of time, space, culture and distance in OSO. An exploratory approach was employed incorporating both survey and case study methodologies. Three groups of offshore software industry stakeholders were surveyed to provide a broad-based background to the study, while three specific cases of proximity outsourcing were investigated using interpretive methods. A grounded approach to theory was adopted using the concepts of time, space, culture and distance as a guideline for analysis. The survey findings confirm an awareness by stakeholders of the significance of proximity, location and the persistence of cultural differences in OSO. The case results broadly reflect but also pose challenges to globalisation theories, such as increased economic and social integration, powerlessness of the state, economic development and the apparent irrelevance of space and time made possible by advances in IT. The thesis thus makes its contribution in both extending the debate on globalisation with respect to OSO in new contexts and adding to the under-researched area of spatio-temporal research in the IS field.
NUDIMS. Pamela Abbott, "Proximity-based Offshore Outsourcing: Models for Globalisation Theories" Feb 25, 2005 from 04:00 PM to 06:00 PM Q233, Quinn School, Belfield,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Dr Pamela Abbott (UCD) will present on "Proximity-based Offshore Outsourcing: Models for Globalisation Theories"
Information Technology for Adoption and Intelligent Design of e-Government Procedures (ITAIDE) from Feb 01, 2005 09:30 AM to Mar 22, 2005 12:30 PM
Governments are faced with demands to increase controls on security, safety and international (economic) crime, without increasing an already significant administrative load shared by all parties. It is therefore vital to obtain and use timely information about business transactions and relate this directly to the passage of goods, services and people. However, this information gathering is very costly for organisations, business and public administration. Finding the right balance therefore between control and cost of information gathering is the key to increase competitiveness locally, nationally and internationally. ITAIDE researches and develops new ways of addressing these conflicting goals. Existing best practices in inter-organizational information sharing based on electronic documents, such as e-Invoicing and various national e-Customs projects, are analyzed and results directed to design ICT, policy and practice for use in Living Lab settings. The Living Labs act as action research settings to test the applied use of R&D outcomes of ITAIDE. The Living Labs extend over time and geography, re-using best practice and deploy to new European settings as the key outcome of this project (ITAIDE was previously referred to as ITIADE).
Offshoring Information Technology Jan 28, 2005 from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM Room Q233 Belfield, Quinn School of Business,
At 4pm on Friday 28 Jan in Room Q233, Professor Erran Carmel (who is currently visiting the MIS department from American University, Washington DC) will give a research seminar entitled "Offshoring Information Technology". [ABSTRACT] Ireland was one of the first of the new software export nations – or using today’s parlance, Ireland was one of the first offshore destinations. Yet today, much of the attention has shifted to low-wage destinations such as India. We will survey the global landscape of offshoring. What are the implications for the client firm? For the provider firm? For the client nation? For the provider nation? And what are the implications for the technical teams that now must collaborate over great distances and across time zones and cultures? I have been researching the domain of global software development for a decade now. I have been using three levels of analysis: the team (the distributed team); the firm (the client firm, typically); and the nation (the nation that seeks to enter the software export game).
NUDIMS. Erran Carmel, "Offshoring Information Technology" Jan 28, 2005 from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM Room Q233 Belfield, Quinn School of Business,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Prof. Erran Carmel (American University) will present on "Offshoring Information Technology"
IOIS: Open discussion. from Jan 14, 2005 12:00 PM to Jan 15, 2005 12:00 PM Room Q233 Belfield, Quinn School of Business,
From 3:00 PM Friday 14th Jan. Invited industry representatives & interviewees. Open discussion on the state of inter-organisational information systems at 3:00 PM on Friday 14th in Room 233 in the Quinn School of Business at Belfield. See URL for directions
IOIS Research Progress Workshop Jan 13, 2005 12:00 PM Room N303 Blackrock, Smurfit Graduate School of Business,
From 3:30 PM Thursday 13th Jan. Research team workshop with UCD MBS cohort (Masters in Electronic Business & Masters in Information Systems) in Room N303 at the Michael Smurfit Graduate School of Business, Blackrock. See URL for directions
IOS workshop Aachen and UCD from Jan 11, 2005 12:00 AM to Jan 14, 2005 11:00 PM
The Shape of Inter-Organisational Information Systems. A four day international research workshop between RWTH Aachen Information Systems Research Area (Rheinisch-Westfalische Technische Hochschule Aachen) and the Department of Management Information Systems, University College Dublin (UCD).
Combinatorics Seminar Dec 16, 2004 12:00 PM Q119,
Location R119. Dr. Micheal O hEigeartaigh will give a seminar on Wed 15th Dec in the Quinn School of Business, entitled "Some Combinatorial Enumeration Methods in Local Search Problems".
IFORS Submission Deadline Dec 15, 2004 from 12:00 AM to 04:00 PM Hawaii,
The IFORS Triennial 2005 Conference will bring operational researchers from around the globe together in one of the world's most beautiful locations. We invite you to join your colleagues for the pre-eminent international conference in our field, offering an intensive scientific program covering the full spectrum of topics in operational research. Deadline for submissions Dec. 15th.
Reading Group Nov 10th 2004 Nov 10, 2004 from 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM Common Room,
The next reading group article is "The underlying theory of project management is obsolete" by Lauri Koskela and Gregory Howell. A link to the article is below. We'll meeting in the Common Room at 5pm on Wednesday 10th November
NuDIMS. John Dudley, "What is Chance?" Nov 04, 2004 from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM Q233 Quinn School,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Dr. John Dudley (Leuven) will present on "What is Chance?"
NuDIMS. Steve Frenkel, "Globalization and Work: Towards a theory of dominant interests" Oct 29, 2004 from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM Q233 Quinn School,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Professor Steve Frenkel (Australian Graduate Management School) will present on "Globalization and Work: Towards a theory of dominant interests"
Reading Group Oct 21st 2004 Oct 21, 2004 from 05:00 PM to 06:30 PM Common Room,
CITO Reading Group: From "Information and Organization" Volume 14 issue 2 - PAPER 1: Einstein, Heisenberg, Kant: methodological distinction and conditions of possibilities • Emmanuel Monod. PAPER 2: Seeking the new and the critical in critical realism: déjà vu? • Heinz K. Klein
Reading Group Oct 7th 2004 Oct 07, 2004 from 05:00 PM to 06:30 PM Common Room,
CITO Reading Group: J. Mingers (April 2004), "Real-izing information systems: critical realism as an underpinning philosophy for information systems", Information and organization, Vol. 14, Issue 2, Pages 87-103. ABSTRACT: The paper begins by pointing out the diversity of philosophical positions within IS, and the range of reactions to this diversity. It then discusses problems within the underlying philosophies of science—particularly positivism and interpretivism. With this as a background, the paper proposes critical realism as an underpinning philosophy that has the potential to overcome both sets of difficulties. The theoretical arguments are practically illustrated by critiques of (positivist) statistical analysis and (interpretivist) soft systems methodology.
Reading Group Sept 29th 2004 Sep 29, 2004 from 02:00 PM to 03:30 PM Common Room,
"Repairing Managerial Knowledge-Ability over Distance" by Keith Goodall and John Roberts, Organization Studies (2003), Vol. 24, Issue 7, p. 1153 Abstract: Despite a growing acknowledgement in the literature of the 'socially embedded' character of organizational knowledge, in this article we argue that conceptualizations of knowledge management have remained aloof from the agency that they seek to inform, particularly in relation to managing within physically dispersed organizations. We seek, therefore, to explore the essential link between knowledge and action ('knowledge-ability') through an empirical investigation of the organizational conditions and managerial labour needed to preserve knowledge-ability within a transnational. In order to achieve this, we compare the experiences and practices of three managers located in China, Columbia and Australia as they seek both to communicate knowledge of their local context to the remote centre in order to influence policy and gather knowledge of what is happening remotely in order to coordinate their local action with shifts in corporate thinking. A model of the resources needed in order to limit and repair the damage of distance is generated using this qualitative data. We argue that the labour of repairing knowledge-ability should be understood as an essential aspect of the workings of power relations within the transnational, and involves an intensification of self-disciplinary practices within network forms of organizing.
RSEEM "Relationships in Electronic Markets" from Sep 11, 2004 08:00 PM to Sep 13, 2004 04:00 PM Dublin, Ireland,
The annual Research Symposium on Emerging Electronic Markets (RSEEM) is a forum to present and discuss current and ongoing research. In order to stimulate a lively discussion the number of participants will be limited to 25.
Reading Group Sept 8th 2004 Sep 08, 2004 from 02:30 PM to 04:30 PM C201,
Review of papers provided by seminarees prior to their presentations over Thursday and Friday of this week. See URL for details (Login Required)
Reading Group Aug 26th 2004 Aug 26, 2004 from 02:00 PM to 03:00 PM Student Club,
"Wiki: A Technology for Conversational Knowledge Management and Group Collaboration" by Christian Wagner. Read the article, then experiment as follows; go to each of the following pages, recall your impressions, what do you see, feel, understand. What is happening? http://mis.ucd.ie/wiki is our MIS Wiki, this link is to a Wiki hosted here in the Quinn Building. You need to have "joined" the site to have rights to edit and collaborate on it (should we change this to allow anonymous contribution?). Have a look, join, feel free to contribute. The C2.com http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?WelcomeVisitors site is the original community Wiki written and led by Ward Cunningham. Finally look at http://wikipedia.org
Reading Group July 20th, 2004 Jul 20, 2004 from 05:30 PM to 07:00 PM Common Room,
Du Gay, P. and Salaman, G. (1992) 'The Cult[Ure] of the Customer', Journal of Management Studies, 29(5), 615-633.
Reading Group, July 8th 2004 Jul 08, 2004 from 05:30 PM to 07:00 PM Common Room ,
'Disconnected Capitalism: or, why employers can't keep their side of the bargain' by Paul Thompson, Work, Employment and Society, 2003, Vol 17(2): 359-378 'The big picture franchise - who has it and what do they claim?'
Reading Group June 29th 2004 Jun 29, 2004 from 05:30 PM to 06:30 PM Common Room,
Technology and Human Vulnerability by Sherry Turkle, HBR, September 2003. We're going to have the next CITO Reading Group on Tuesday 29th June (5.30pm in the Common Room). Following on from our discussion of emotional intelligence, the next reading is: Different Voice: Technology and Human Vulnerability By Sherry Turkle, HBR, September 2003. "We know that technology changes our lives - but could it be changing our selves as well?" Regards, Anita
NuDIMS. Neil Ashkanasy, "Emotion in Organizations: A Multilevel Perspective" Jun 17, 2004 from 04:30 PM to 05:30 PM Q233 Quinn School,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Neil Ashkanasy (University of Queensland, Australia) will present on "Emotion in Organizations: A Multilevel Perspective"
Reading Group June 15th 2004 Jun 15, 2004 from 05:30 PM to 06:30 PM Common Room,
The third CITO reading group. Emotion in the Workplace: The New Challenge for Managers Details of the next CITO Reading Group are as follows: Tuesday, June 15th @ 5.30pm in the Common Room The reading is "Emotion in the Workplace: The New Challenge for Managers" by Neal M. Ashkanasay and Catherine S. Daus (Academy of Management Executive, 2002, Vol 16. No 1). Neal Ashkanasay is giving a NuDIMS presentation on Thursday June 17th, so this will give us a chance to discuss his work before the NuDIMS seminar. Regards, Anita
NuDIMS. Andrew Brown, "Narrative and Identity" Jun 11, 2004 from 04:30 PM to 05:30 PM Q233 Quinn School,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Prof. Andrew Brown (University of Nottingham) will present on "Narrative and Identity"
Reading Group June 3rd 2004 Jun 03, 2004 from 05:30 PM to 06:30 PM
The second CITO reading group. Discussion of the state of IS Research. The readings are taken from the JAIS debate in December 2003 and are all available online. There were 8 people at the inaugural CITO reading group. We more or less agreed to disagree with Nicholas Carr's claim that IT doesn't matter, but had a variety of reasons for why we disagreed with him. In 90 minutes we managed to cover organisational innovation, strategy, management, org. charts, power & politics, competitive advantage and the open source movement. We decided to have another meeting next Thursday (3rd June) at 5.30pm in the Common Room. Taking our inspiration from Carr's 'fuzzy' definition of IT, we're going to discuss the state of IS Research. The readings are taken from the JAIS debate in December 2003 and are all available online: Galliers, R. D. (2003) ‘Change as Crisis or Growth? Toward a Trans- disciplinary View of Information Systems as a Field of Study: A Response to Benbasat and Zmud's Call for Returning to the IT Artifact’ Volume 4 Article 13 November, 2003 http://jais.aisnet.org/articles/default.asp?vol=4&art=13 Robey, D (2003) ‘Identity, Legitimacy and the Dominant Research Paradigm: An Alternative Prescription for the IS Discipline: A Response to Benbasat and Zmud's Call for Returning to the IT Artifact’ Volume 4 Article 15 December, 2003 http://jais.aisnet.org/articles/default.asp?vol=4&art=15 Regards, Anita
Reading Group May 27th 2004 May 27, 2004 from 05:30 PM to 06:30 PM Common Room,
CITO Reading Group: "IT Doesn't Matter" by Nicholas G. Carr (Harvard Business Review, May 2003, Vol 81, Issue 5, p. 41-49). After months of talking about it, we've organised the first meeting of the Centre for Information, Technology and Organisation (CITO) Reading Group. We plan to hold regular (informal) sessions throughout the summer, based on articles/books suggested by CITO Reading Group members. Details of the inaugural meeting are as follows: VENUE: The Common Room TIME & DATE: Thursday 27th May, 5.30pm The first reading is "IT Doesn't Matter" by Nicholas G. Carr. Harvard Business Review, May 2003, Vol 81, Issue 5, p. 41-49. Copies of the article are available in my office (Q235). ABSTRACT: As information technology has grown in power and ubiquity, companies have come to view it as ever more critical to their success; their heavy spending on hardware and software clearly reflects that assumption. But scarcity, not ubiquity, makes a business resource truly strategic - and allows companies to use it for a sustained competitive advantage. You only gain an edge over rivals by doing something that they cannot. IT is the latest in a series of broadly adopted technologies - think of the railroad or the electric generator - that have reshaped industry over the past two centuries. IT management should, frankly, become boring. It should focus on reducing risks, not increasing opportunities. For example, companies need to pay more attention to ensuring network and data security. Even more important, they need to manage IT costs more aggressively. IT may not help a company gain a strategic advantage, but it could easily put a company at a cost disadvantage. The article provoked a strong reaction among IT executives and led to a series of debates about the business value of IT. Nicholas Carr lists the responses (see url). It's worth browsing through this additional article as it contains links to a variety of responses from CEOs, IT magazine editors, academics and users. Some background information on CITO can be found here CITO Hope to see you on the 27th, Anita
NuDIMS. Miller & Kurunmäki, "Modernisation, Partnerships and the Regulation of Risk" May 20, 2004 from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM Q233 Quinn School,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Prof. Peter Miller and Dr Liisa Kurunmäki (LSE) will present on "Modernisation, Partnerships and the Regulation of Risk"
NuDIMS. Donncha Kavanagh, "Ocularcentrism and its Others: A Framework for Metatheoretical Analysis" Dec 11, 2003 from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM Q233 Quinn School,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Dr Donncha Kavanagh (University College Cork) will present on "Ocularcentrism and its Others: A Framework for Metatheoretical Analysis"
NuDIMS. Sharon Bolton, "Understanding the Pleasures and Pains of Organisational Life: Introducing a Typology of Workplace Emotion" Nov 19, 2003 from 04:30 PM to 06:30 PM N303, Smurfit School of Business, UCD, Blackrock,
You are cordially invited to the next NuDIMS seminar. Dr Sharon Bolton (University of Lancaster) will present on "Understanding the Pleasures and Pains of Organisational Life: Introducing a Typology of Workplace Emotion"